Education Assistant Martin Morones talks about the Museum’s role in education

Martin Morones speak with a group of school children in the Heritage Gallery.

Martin Morones speak with a group of school children in the Heritage Gallery.

I work as the Education Assistant for the Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History. What does that mean? Well, I get to work on some amazing projects that take me both outside and indoors. I started working for the Museum in September of 2015 to work on the Eco Ambassadors: Fifth Grade Pollinator Gardens project. With Todd Weston, the Museum’s Education Specialist, we taught over 700 5th Graders from 11 elementary schools in the Monterey Peninsula Unified School District (MPUSD) about native plants, pollinators, and about the need to create native habitats for them. Part of this program was for students to build native plant gardens on their campus; and it was enjoyable to watch them take ownership of it. 
In January 2016 I started to help Todd with our Watershed Explores program in partnership with the Monterey Peninsula Regional Parks District (MPRPD). We visited K-5 classrooms from Marina to Carmel and taught about watersheds and how our local watershed provides water to the Monterey Peninsula. After our classroom visits, the class took a field trip to Garland Ranch Regional Park. We hiked around the valley floor and down to the river. During the trip, we looked for different examples of life and thought about how organisms interacted with the watershed. At the river, students caught and observed macroinvertebrates, such as Mayflies and Damselflies. The students loved using a sampling net to catch the animals and they got ecstatic if one of them caught a trout fry or tadpole. 
During breaks from our programs with MPUSD and MPRPD I have been fortunate enough to work with school groups in the Museum and was able to share a piece of everything we have to offer. I did talks about monarchs, birds and about predators and preys. I also led the school groups on scavenger hunts through the Museum. 
This spring I have been busy planning and producing the activities for the Museum’s Summer Camp. We will have eight, one-week long camps with different topics each week. The camps range in age from 4 to 12-years-old and range in topics from Art and Nature to Physics and Chemistry. This year we also have a week dedicated solely to girls and science! It should be a fun summer. 
I have enjoyed working with the Museum so far and I am excited to see where the future here takes me.